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File #: 21-4176    Version: 1 Name: HLC#21-008: Establishment of a Cultural Landscape designation
Type: Consideration Item Status: Passed
File created: 7/8/2021 In control: Historic Landmark Commission
On agenda: Final action: 7/13/2021
Title: HLC#21-008: Establishment of a Cultural Landscape designation
Attachments: 1. Mansfield Gin Detail from 1921 Sanborn Map.pdf, 2. Preservation Brief 36_ Protecting Cultural Landscapes.pdf, 3. THC Cultural Landscapes article.pdf
Title
HLC#21-008: Establishment of a Cultural Landscape designation

Description/History
The Commission’s recent review of the Harrison property at 400 W. Oak Street as a possible site for the historic village exposed a need for a new designation for properties that have historic significance but do not qualify for landmark status. Staff recommends a new designation Cultural Landscape designation for properties that have historic significance but do not have historic buildings. The designation would be similar to Official Recognition and will not impose any landmark restrictions on the property.

A cultural landscape is defined by the National Park Service as a geographic area (including both cultural and natural resources and the wildlife or domestic animals therein), associated with a historic event, activity, or person or exhibiting other cultural or aesthetic values. Cultural landscapes are composed of a collection of character-defining features, which may include small-scale features like statuary and benches, as well as large patterns of fields, forests, and other features that demarcate the land. Character-defining features are generally organized as topography; vegetation; circulation; water features, and; structures, site furnishings, and objects.

There are four general types of cultural landscapes:

Historic Designed Landscape
A landscape that was consciously designed or laid out by a landscape architect, master gardener, architect, or horticulturist according to design principles, or an amateur gardener working in a recognized style or tradition.

Historic Vernacular Landscape
A landscape that evolved through use by the people whose activities or occupancy shaped that landscape.

Historic Site
A landscape significant for its association with a historic event, activity, or person.

Ethnographic Landscape
A landscape containing a variety of natural and cultural resources that associated people define as heritage resources.

The Harrison pro...

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